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Brooke Barnett, Psy.D
INDIVIDUAL, CHILD & FAMILY PSYCHOTHERAPY
Common Questions
Why do people go to therapy and how do I know if it is right for me?

People have many different motivations for coming to psychotherapy.  Some may be going through a major life transition (unemployment, divorce, new job, etc.), or struggling to handle a  stressful situation.  Some people need assistance managing a range of other issues such as low self-esteem, depression, anxiety, addictions, relationship problems, spiritual conflicts and issues realted to parenting. Therapy can help provide some much needed encouragement and help with skills to get them through these periods. Others may be at a point where they are ready to learn more about themselves or want to be more effective with their goals in life. In addtion, therapists can provide support, problem-solving skills, and enhanced coping strategies for issues such as depression, anxiety, relationship troubles, unresolved childhood issues, stress management, and body image issues. Many people also find that therapists can be a tremendous asset to managing personal growth, interpersonal relationships, family concerns, marriage issues, and the hassles of daily life.

 What is therapy like?
 
Because each person has different issues and goals for therapy, therapy will be different depending on the individual.  In general, you can expect to discuss the current events happening in your life, your personal history relevant to your issue, and report progress (or any new insights gained) from the previous therapy session. Depending on your specific needs, therapy can be short-term, for a specific issue, or longer-term, to deal with more difficult patterns or your desire for more personal development.  Either way, it is most common to schedule regular sessions with your therapist (usually weekly for 50-minutes).
 
It is important to understand that you will get more results from therapy if you actively participate in the process.  The ultimate purpose of therapy is to help you bring what you learn in session back into your life. Therefore, beyond the work you do in therapy sessions, your therapist may suggest some things you can do outside of therapy to support your process. 
 
What about medication vs. psychotherapy?  
 
It is well established that the long-term solution to mental and emotional problems and the pain they cause cannot be solved solely by medication. Instead of just treating the symptom, therapy addresses the cause of our distress and the behavior patterns that curb our progress. I encourage client's to work with their medical doctor to determine what's best for you, and in some cases a combination of medication and therapy is the right course of action. Deciding to take medication for a mental health issue is a very personal decision, and my goal will be to support you in deciding what is best given your beliefs, symptoms, and current situation.
 
Do you take insurance, and how does that work?
 
To determine if you have mental health coverage through your insurance carrier, the first thing you should do is call them. Check your coverage carefully and make sure you understand their answers.  Please be aware that I am NOT on any inusrance panels but, if your provider will allow you to use an out-of-network provider, you may be able to get reimbursed that way.
 
  • What are my mental health benefits?
  • Can I get reimbursed if I use an out-of network provider?
  • What is the coverage amount per therapy session?
  • How many therapy sessions does my plan cover?
  • How much does my insurance pay for an out-of-network provider?
  • Is approval required from my primary care physician?